February 2019

The library will be closed on Monday, February 18th for Presidents Day.

On Tuesdays and Thursday afternoons, we have programming for young adults, ages 13-19. For details about what is being offered when, we strongly suggest you sign up for the newsletter, which comes out every Monday afternoon. February activities include movie nights, a Valentine’s Day party and Korean cooking!

Mark your calendars for Feb 15th and 16th. We will be having a massive dollar book sale in the Adult Multipurpose Room. Every book will be $1. It will be a great opportunity to stock up on gifts for you or your friends and family. All money made during the sale is put back into the library.

Can’t keep track of it all?  Friend us on Facebook, subscribe to the newsletter, or check our Google calendar attached to our web page .  Or call the library at 386-7148 for more information. This is truly the best way to keep current with all our programming details.

What’s new to read?

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Have you been missing Allan Karlsson? The hero of The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared has a new adventure! This time Allan and his intrepid sidekick Julius decide a hot air balloon ride is just the ticket for a lovely excursion with some beautiful views. Three

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bottles of champagne later they crash in the ocean and are rescued by the North Koreans. Soon Allan and Julius are up to their eyeballs in international politics. The Accidental Further Adventures of the 110-Year-Old Man comes highly recommended.

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Murder mysteries with animal characters have long been popular. E. J. Copperman is the author of a number of mystery series, but the newest novel is called Bird, Bath and Beyond, the second book in the Agent to the Paws series. Kay Powell is a theatrical agent to non-human animals. At the start of the novel she is keeping Barney, a very clever parrot, while he is working on the set of his new TV show. Barney is the only witness to the murder of the show’s star and becomes a “bird of interest” in the investigation. Talking parrots don’t actually converse; they just repeat words and phrases they have learned. But, does the murderer know that?

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Wil Medearis’ first novel is called Restoration Heights. Reddick is an artist living in New  living in New York City, making ends meet by delivering and hanging art for wealthy clients. His life is thrown into turmoil when he’s one of the last people to see the fiancé of his current client before she goes missing. He’s quickly and mysteriously hired by another society family to look into the disappearance. Restoration Heights follows Reddick’s hunt to find out what happened to Hannah as he navigates the class, cultural, and racial layers of New York.

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E. G. Scott is a pseudonym for two writers who have many writing credits on their own – this is their first joint venture. This book is already being adapted as a TV series by Blumhouse, the producers of Sharp Objects. Rebecca and Paul have been married for twenty years and almost everything is coming unglued. Rebecca takes too many pills, Paul has started an affair, and women start disappearing. If you like books full of unreliable narrators, and really nasty characters, The Woman Inside might be worth a look.

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This is one of Amazon’s best books of December 2018. Diane Setterfield (author of The Thirteenth Tale and Bellman & Black) has written Once Upon a River.  When a man bursts into a riverside inn on the night of the winter solstice, covered in blood and carrying a dead child, the patrons of the Swan are beyond thrilled to find themselves in the middle of a swiftly unfolding tale—especially when the child is determined to actually be alive. Is this mute girl the long-missing daughter of a nearby wealthy family, or the bastard child of woman who threw herself in the Thames only a day or so earlier? Inquiring minds want to know.

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Alice Walker is an American institution – and a Georgia native. She has published a collection of 70 poems in both English and Spanish. Taking the Arrow Out of The Heart includes poems on everyday joys and also on the terrible evils in the world. There is a poem for Mohammed Ali and one for B. B. King and another for the migrant children kept in cages at the Mexican border. The Spanish translations are done by Manuel Garcia Verdecia, a professor of Cuban History, a translator and a writer in his own right.

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So, here’s an idea. To protect the United States from incoming intercontinental ballistic missiles from Russia, we could launch nuclear warheads into outer space and detonate them there. The resulting curtains of falling radiation from the blasts would fry incoming ICBMs and we would be safe. What could go wrong?  Mark Wolverton has written Burning the Sky: Operation Argus and the Untold Story of the Cold War Nuclear Tests in Outer Space, describing Nicholas Christofilos’ efforts to turn the Earth’s atmosphere into a nuclear experiment.

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After the previous title, we need something different. Lauren Stowell has published The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking: How to Hand Sew Georgian Gowns and Wear Them With Style. The book is divided into four parts, each dedicated to a different type of gown common in the 18th century (think some of the clothes you see on Outlander), right down to all the underclothes (but not the stays or corsets), the hats and the gloves. A finished gown would be a true labor of love for a very special occasion.

Did you know?

The library would like to thank Lois Harper at Wall of Books for remembering us when she closed her store in December. She gifted us with the entire remaining inventory from the store. We have been busy sorting and repackaging books that have been sent around to other branches in the system as well as books for distribution through the Big Green Reading Machine. Have a great retirement Lois. We wish you all the best of everything.

We are rapidly approaching that time of year when municipalities start thinking about the budget for the next fiscal year. We are sometimes asked about what regular citizens can do to influence where their tax dollars are spent and how to support the library. Oleg Kagan is a library advocate that often writes about what library lovers can do to make sure their local libraries stay healthy and relevant. Here are three of his suggestions.

  1. Visit the library. If you do not use it, it is more likely you will lose it. The library has added a lot of new services over the years – do you know about them? Looking for a service we do not offer? Ask us about it. If we can figure out a way to make it happen, we will.
  2. Support organizations/businesses that support literacy and the library. This would include the library foundation, our book sales and other fundraising and advocacy activities as well as all the organizations in town that provide services that help increase literacy in our area.
  3. Mr. Kagan suggests that “library lovers should routinely send letters to elected officials extolling the life-changing influence of the library. They don’t have to be long or complex; a few paragraphs and your signature are just right.” He goes on to say the letters should be positive, tell your story, include your facts and avoid filler.

If you are looking for more help on how to Love Your Library, there are some resources online and through the Georgia Public Library System. Next time you are in, ask us about them.