March 2019

Do you need another reason … (to go to the library?) March 2019

Community Story time every Thursdays at 10:00 am for the younger people (from 2-5 years old) and their grownups.

On Tuesdays and Thursday afternoons, we have programming for young adults, ages 13-19. For details about what is being offered when, we strongly suggest you sign up for the newsletter, which comes out every Monday afternoon.

March 2nd between 1-2pm, come on in to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday! Come and party with Thing 1 and Thing 2, eat Seussian snacks, play games and hear some of the best of the books we can’t hear often enough. No green eggs and ham being served, sorry.

Can’t keep track of it all?  Friend us on Facebook, subscribe to the newsletter, or check our Google calendar attached to our web page .  Or call the library at 386-7148 for more information. This is truly the best way to keep current with all our programming details.

What’s new to read?

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Named One of the Best 2019 Winter Books by PopSugar and chosen as One of 9 Books to Read This February by Instyle! Alyson Richman has written The Secret of Clouds, which tells the story of Yuri, a child born with a rare health condition that keeps him isolated from the rest of the world, and Maggie, the dedicated teacher who agrees to tutor him.

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The City of Brass has a sequel! The Kingdom of Copper continues this Middle Eastern fantasy trilogy that has been compared to Game of ThronesFire and Ice for descriptions of palace intrigue. S. A. Chakraborty is a speculative fiction writer from New York City. Her first book was shortlisted for the Locus, British Fantasy and World Fantasy awards.

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Vampire books have come a long way since Dracula began nibbling necks in 1897. If you have been following the genre, Deborah Harkness recently wrote a wildly popular series, The All Souls Trilogy, the first book of which has recently been adapted for television. (You may have seen A Discovery of Witches on the Sundance cable channel.) Ms. Harkness has brought back the characters from the series in Time’s Convert. Matthew de Clermont meets Marcus
MacNeil on a battlefield during the American Revolutionary War and makes him a very attractive offer – immortality. It’s not an easy process, of course. Other reviewers of this book have suggested that readers start by reading the trilogy because there are many references to events, people and places that would make little sense to people unfamiliar with Ms. Harkness’ world.

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Pitchaya Sudbanthad’s first novel is a love letter to the city of Bangkok. Bangkok Wakes to Rain is a collection of different snippets of peoples’ lives throughout time. What all of these stories have in common is the Thai manor house where all these people lived and the city of Bangkok itself. Named one of 2019’s most anticipated books by Amazon, it is for readers who enjoy literary fiction.

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No Mercy is Joanna Schaffhausen’s second novel. Police officer Ellery Hathaway is on leave. Not voluntary, but because she shot a murderer and is not appropriately apologetic or appalled. She has been remanded to group therapy with others who have been victims of violent crime (Ellery survived the attentions of a serial killer in the first novel of this series) and finds her fellow clients have issues in their lives far beyond anything that group therapy can resolve. One woman in particular, a victim of a brutal rape whose abuser is still free, attracts Officer Hathaway’s attention. Can Hathaway help this woman, keep her job and perhaps quiet her own demons?

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If you like recipes and memoir, do give Ann Hood’s Kitchen Yarns: Notes on Life, Love, and Food a try. A collection of essays and recipes that describe the southern Italian food of her childhood, her experiences with international cuisine during her travels as an airline attendant, her marriages, and her children. And the recipes to go with all these fun, memorable, and sometimes heartbreakingly sad times. Recommended by Jacque Pepin!

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The Feminism Book: Big Ideas Simply Explained is produced by the Big Idea staff at DK. It explores more than 85 of the most important movements, ideas and events that have defined feminism and feminist thought throughout history. As all the Big Ideas books, this is a very graphical book, full of maps, charts, pictures of events and key characters. The book is arranged chronologically, but lends itself to browsing.

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Could your child be described as an orchid (sensitive, susceptible and fragile) or as a dandelion (hardy, resilient and healthy)? Dr. W. Thomas Boyce has written The Orchid and the Dandelion: Why Some Children Struggle and How All Can Thrive to help parents understand how genetic makeup and environment shape behavior and what a parent can do to help provide a space where each child can best thrive.

Did you know?

We are well on our way to having our summer reading schedule settled. This years’ theme is the Universe of Stories and we plan to have a wide variety of programs and activities that will appeal to a wide variety of ages and tastes. We have already got the materials together to create our own homemade planetarium! Watch for our completed schedules coming up soon.

The Big Green Reading Machine is also in the process of getting back on the road again. Look for us at the Rhythm and Ribs Festival on March 2nd and Community Cares Resource Fair at the Rec Center on March 9th!   Big Green is also planning on working with the summer feeding program again this summer, visiting at least some of the feeding sites, distributing books and working with kids who, for whatever reason, may not be able to attend library programming in our building. It is promising to be a very busy summer for the library!