April 2019

Do you need another reason … (to go to the library?) April 2019

Community Story time every Thursdays at 10:00 am for the younger people (from 2-5 years old) and their grownups.

The second week of April is National Library Week. Come by and say hello. We will be having book sales and maybe some other activities to celebrate our week.

Springtime is a Perfect Time for a Tea Party! So Join Us at the Tifton-Tift County Public Library on Friday, April 19 from 3:00pm-4:00pm
for some Fancy Treats, creative Dress-up Tips, Guide to Speaking Fancy, and more. All kids are welcome, but kids ages 2-8 will likely have the most fun.

Join us for Easter Bunny Storytime: Thursday, April 18, 2019 10:00am. Ages 2-7 with caregiver.

On Tuesdays and Thursday afternoons, we have programming for young adults, ages 13-19. For details about what is being offered when, we strongly suggest you sign up for the newsletter, which comes out every Monday afternoon.

Can’t keep track of it all?  Friend us on Facebook, subscribe to the newsletter, or check our Google calendar attached to our web page .  Or call the library at 386-7148 for more information. This is truly the best way to keep current with all our programming details.

What’s new to read?

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Kit Carradine is just a run of the mill famous author. Until he is approached by a man who says he is an MI6 agent and needs Carradine’s help to deliver some information to someone who will approach him at a book fair he is planning to attend in Morocco. This entry into the spy world is exciting, simple and addictive. Until it becomes very dangerous. The Moroccan Girl is written by Charles Cumming.

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Stalker is number five in the Joona Linna series. Detective Joona Linna reunites with hypnotist Erik Maria Bark in a search for a seemingly unstoppable killer who is taunting the police. One of the popular atmospheric Scandinavian series, these books are graphic, violent and should appeal to people who are fans of Stieg Larsson.  This series is written by Lars Kepler, a husband and wife team who live in Stockholm.

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There is a new Ghostwalker novel! Christine Feehan has published Toxic Game, the story of Shyla and Draden, two of Whitney’s genetically altered beings that are sent to track down the creator and distributer of a virus that could easily destroy the word. The Ghostwalker novels do not have to be read in a particular order, so feel free to start with this one!

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Elizabeth McCracken (the author of The Giant’s House) has written Bowlaway, a quirky novel that starts with a mystery. Who IS the woman who is discovered unconscious in the Salford, Massachusetts cemetery with a bowling ball, a candlepin and fifteen pounds of gold in her bag?

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The Bird King is a historical fantasy set in 1491 during the reign of the last Muslim sultan in the Iberian Peninsula. Fatima is a concubine in the sultan’s court and her best friend is Hassan, the mapmaker. Hassan has a secret talent – he can draw maps of places he has never been and cause those places he “maps” to become real. It is a charmed existence until the newly formed Christian Spanish monarchy comes to
negotiate the terms of the sultan’s surrender. Hassan’s gift is viewed as sorcery by the new rulers and Fatima and Hassan are forced to flee the palace. They journey across Spain, looking for refuge on an island that many people know of, but no one has visited. G. Willow Wilson’s first novel Alif the Unseen won multiple awards and this book is likely to do the same.

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If you like your novels to have real people as characters, you may find The Age of Light  by Whitney Scharer a good read. Lee Miller was one of the most popular American models of the early twentieth century, when she moves to Paris to reinvent herself as a professional photographer. She becomes Man Ray’s first student – not because he wanted a student, but because she insisted she was going to be his student and he would teach her everything he knew. Lee Miller becomes a brilliant and pioneering artist in her own right, discovering new photographic techniques and documenting the liberation of the concentration camps as one of the first female war correspondents.

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Another story of someone reinventing themselves is The Volunteer, by Salvatore Scibona. The beginning of the story finds a small boy abandoned in an international airport with only the clothes on his back and a little money in a pocket. He speaks a language no one recognizes. To understand what is led to this action, the narrative goes back to a time years before when Vollie Frade joined the Marines Corp to fight in Vietnam and is recruited to work for a secret agency which requires him to separate himself entirely from his previous life. Salvatore Scibona was a National Book award finalist his first novel, The End.

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This is one of those books that sounds like it should be a novel – but it isn’t. Jessica Chiccelhitto Hindman is a highly motivated violinist from Appalachia who has the opportunity to try to succeed in the big time. It is not going very well, and so she answers an ad on a bulletin board that results in an offer of what she thinks is her dream job. She has been invited to join a professional ensemble in New York City! And she didn’t even have to audition! Sounds Like Titanic is the story of Jessica’s experiences with The Composer, a conductor who doesn’t actually have to conduct, and the ensemble she joins, a group of musicians that do not actually ever play their instruments.

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Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter is by Tom Clavin, longtime author of addictively readable American history. It starts on July 21, 1865, in Springfield, Missouri, when Bill Hickok killed Davis Tutt in the first quick-draw duel on the American frontier. By the time he was murdered in 1876 by a man who shot him in the back of the head at a card game, he was a legend whom we still find fascinating today.

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All of us are getting older. And, from childhood on, we (especially in America) are constantly getting messages telling us how terrible and sad it is to get old. That wrinkles and gray hair are embarrassing and old people somehow become more stupid and useless. Ashton Applewhite is taking this on in This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism.  We are all old people in training but society does little to develop ways to support a healthy, able-bodied, cogitatively agile population.  Ms. Applewhite supplies well-researched answers to the idea that old means computer illiterate, change phobic and isolated.

Did you know?

The Library Foundation is putting together the fall fundraiser. Look for something completely new and different this year. Advertising and Save the Date materials will be coming out soon.

Don’t forget to stop by the library regularly to look at our sale books. We will be running various kinds of book sales during April and would love for you to come and find some books you cannot manage without.